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WELCOME TO EYE PROJECT UGANDA

In Uganda, ophthalmology is a neglected public health sector, as limited resources are being invested in eye care.

There are only 37 Ophthalmologists in Uganda with a population of 40 million, which is less than 1 eye specialist per million of the population; and one ophthalmic clinical officer per 205,000 of the population, while there are only 2 ophthalmic nurses.

Half of all blind people who have lost their sight due to preventable causes such as cataracts, could be treated, while 70% of children in Uganda can be helped to see again at low cost, so there is hope given the right support and investment into the sector.
 

 


 

 

Working together to improve eye care in Uganda


Eye Project Uganda was set up by Primrose Magala, a Ugandan senior Ophthalmic Nurse at Londons' famous Moorfields Eye Hospital, and author of '
The Eye Opener' book.

Eye Project Uganda, in collaboration with Lubaga Hospital, the Uganda UK Health Alliance (UUKHA), Helping Uganda Schools (HUGS) and Abalon Trust charities, aims to treat and reduce avoidable blindness.

Ultimately Primrose's dream is to build a proper eye care centre of excellence in Uganda to teach more Ophthalmologists and Optometrists, and to treat poor children and adults who do not have the financial means to pay for treatment. Eye Project Uganda is already sponsoring 5 postgraduate opthalmology doctors, and HUGS has decided to fund 2 students a year up to 6 in 3 years, so pre centre of excellence education is under way, and more funding and sponsors are needed.

Eye Project Uganda is also taking a team of Nurses and Doctors to Uganda, which includes volunteers from Moorfields Eye Hospital, later in 2017 with the aim of treating 300 children and adults. This is part of a programme of on-going eye camps which started with the treatment of children in June 2017. 

Funding is required for this and for future camps, whereby treatment can cost some GBP 40 - for example for an assessment and eye drops or spectacles; to some GBP 4,000 plus - for example for a corneal transplant.


With your support, we want to treat more underprivileged communities especially children. We also want to reduce the current expensive charges.

 

100 children to undergo cataract surgery

 

NEW VISION Newspaper article

By Denis Ongeng Added 23rd October 2017



About 100 children will undergo free cataract surgery and squints corrections at Lubaga Hospital in Kampala at an eyecare camp.

The two-day eye camp will be held on November 20 and 21 and will attract eyecare experts from within Uganda and abroad.




The camp is being organised by Eye Care Project Uganda in collaboration with Lubaga Hospital, Uganda-UK Health Alliance (UUKHA) and Helping Uganda Schools (HUGS).

The chief executive officer of Lubaga Hospital, Dr Andrew SSekitooleko, said they have joined other partners to contribute towards Vision 2020, which aims to reduce preventable blindness in the Uganda.

"The camp will have in-country experts and expatriate medical and optometric support from Moorefield Eye Hospital in London,ˮ he said in an interview.

Primrose Magala of Eye care Project Uganda, said the intervention would provide hope for both adults and children who cannot afford expensive eye surgeries.

Magala, who is a senior Ophthalmic Nurse at Moorefield Eye Hospital, said a concerted effort is needed to reduce avoidable blindness.  

According to Dr Anne Ampaire Musika, an ophthalmologist and a lecturer at Makerere University, at least six million Ugandans are undeserved in terms of eye care services.

 

SUCCESS SO FAR

  • 4 eye camps in the Jinja region within 3 months

  • 24 children assessed by Priya Gupta

  • 16 have received spectacles and eye drops and treatment is complete

  • 8 have been referred to Mengo Hospital and 3 have had operations

  • Unfortunately 1 child died of a tumour eye illness while we sought funds to treat her


 
 

featured story of aaron

 

Aaron, who is a 14 year old child, has had a Corneal Graft in one of his eyes as a result of thankful fundraising.

He has another eye operation to come in his other eye.

At 14 years of age, Aaron can now see his mum, family and friends for the first in his life.

Aaron still needs ongoing support and care, including eye drops to help him to continue with his ongoing treatment. Eye drops are expensive in Uganda, and there is a lack of access to what many of us take for granted. 

 

  

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WORKING TOGETHER TO IMPROVE EYE CARE IN UGANDA


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